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Continuing the Conversation of Educational Equity by Using Video

Maddy Sirois
Maddy Sirois

January 16, 2020

Studies list the post-Millennial generation as the most diverse generation in the US to date. Generation Z currently consists of 7- to 22-year-olds who vary more in race, ethnicity, orientation, and economic background than any other generation at this age. Considering the education system is currently made up primarily of this generation, educators must be aware of these individual differences in their teaching practices.

By creating a more equitable education system, teachers and institutes ensure that every student can succeed. This process starts by understanding the difference between equity and equality. Whereas equality entails treating everyone the same, equity is the practice of giving everyone the resources and opportunities necessary to become equal (The Glossary of Education Reform). Equitable education often involves providing different or additional resources to those who might be considered underserved than those who are not.

There are different ways in which teachers can promote a more equitable environment in their classrooms, beginning with recognizing and acknowledging the different backgrounds that students come from, and how those might affect their process of learning.

Inequity can take shape in a variety of forms, due to circumstances related to the student, the educator, the school, or all three. Conditions might include the socioeconomic status of the student, the inability for less wealthy schools to attract top-performing teachers, or the design of assessments.

So why does this all matter?

Though educators and administrators might try to create more equality within their schools, they sometimes fail to recognize that not all students come from the same background. So even when giving students the same resources and opportunities, those who didn’t have the same starting point as their peers will still end up finishing behind (Cummings). By focusing resources on those who need them most instead, schools can ensure that equitable inputs lead to equal outcomes for their students.

Using platforms like Vosaic enables teachers to spot cues of inequity that they may have missed at the moment, allowing them to identify students who might need some form of intervention.

The responsibility to make education more equitable doesn’t fall solely on teachers, but they potentially have the most direct impact. There are different ways in which teachers can promote a more equitable environment in their classrooms, beginning with recognizing and acknowledging the different backgrounds that students come from, and how those might affect their process of learning. The process also involves giving every student a voice and listening to what they’re saying, and discouraging practices and behaviors that might alienate specific groups or individuals (Stroud).

Creating a cultural and behavioral shift in the classroom sounds like it could be a bit overwhelming, especially when some of the signs of inequity might be a little harder to spot amidst the chaos of the classroom. One way that schools can encourage more mindful and equitable practices is by introducing video into the classroom.

Using platforms like Vosaic enables teachers to spot cues of inequity that they may have missed at the moment, allowing them to identify students who might need some form of intervention. Teachers can also benefit from the learning opportunity that’s provided by observing how they themselves and their peers deal with instances of inequity.


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Getting Started With Video Toolkit (PDF).

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Includes:

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  • Common Answers to Video Questions
  • Walkthrough Sample
  • Observation Sample
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